THE BEST OF 2019

OUR TOP FIVE FILMS OF THE YEAR

YEAR IN REVIEW
By Charlie David Page
25th December 2019

It's been a mixed bag for film lovers - while there have been some real gems hitting our cinema screens over the past year, the misses have outweighed the hits, making 2019 a tough year to sit through. Nonetheless, each of the members of SWITCH have compiled their top five films - with plenty of controversial choices from the year.

The only rules: it can only be five films, and it has to have been released in Australian cinemas in 2019. Take a look for yourself and let us know what you think!

JUMP TO...

JOEL KALKOPF
5
'THE FAREWELL'
This film snuck into my list right at the death. It was meant to be 'Avengers: Endgame', but the more I think about what I watched in 2019, the more 'The Farewell' kept playing on my mind. I haven't stopped thinking about Lulu Wang's autobiographical family adventure, and I'm not sure I ever will. Firstly, it's worth noting Awkwafina's brilliance in her first dramatic role, perfectly portraying the internal anguish of keeping a "good lie" to protect her family. Secondly, it's clearly a very personal and specific story to Wang, making it all feel so real. The shot at the end where we see Nai Nai waving goodbye to the family from the car absolutely destroyed me, the parallels of my own overseas family feeling overwhelmingly accurate.
4
'KNIVES OUT'
It was labelled as a Rian Johnson "Whodunnit", and yeah, he did it. Not the murder of Harlem Thrombey (Christopher Plummer) of course, that's for the magnetic Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig) to solve. This is the most fun film of 2019, filled with colourful characters, and even more colourful sweaters. Each family member is slightly more intriguing than the last, but none more so than Ana De Armas' Marta, who becomes the central figure and Benoit's sidekick, mainly due to the fact that she can't lie without throwing up. It's a real crowd-pleaser - even with all the not-so-subtle political subtext sewn throughout - because it's original, it's funny, and it's intriguing. It's a mystery that will keep audiences guessing, and more importantly, entertained.
READ THE REVIEW
3
'MARRIAGE STORY'
Is there such a thing as a love story about divorce? Probably not, but Noah Baumbach's film is certainly a story about a relationship, told through the perspective of a divorce. By far the most devastating and yet reflective film this year, 'Marriage Story' is a true character piece of the highest calibre. Baumbach's screenwriting is phenomenal; he weaponises everyday character traits but still manages to find hints of comedy in the middle of this excruciating battle. But it's more than that - there is a sharpness in how he moulds everything in service of the character and drama. He doesn't position Scarlett Johansson or Adam Driver as one being more right or wrong over the other, finding tenderness in the moments in between the madness. It's an acting masterclass as well as poignant visual storytelling, giving it a deserving place in my top five of the year. Oh, and Adam Driver sings Sondheim.
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2
'THE IRISHMAN'
So, this is what Martin Scorsese was talking about when he says "cinema". I was sceptical when news broke of the de-ageing CGI, but honestly, bar a couple of times (Robert DeNiro beating up a shot attendant), the acting and visuals are so strong that you don't even notice. DeNiro, Al Pacino, and Joe Pesci are a tour de force, and it would be remiss not to mention the outstanding supporting cast. The opening "oner" in an old-age home immediately gives this film a different gravitas to the genre Scorsese made famous. It's not flashy or trying to parade a gangster's paradise; it's grounded and sincere, highlighted by Anna Paquin's embodiment of a scared daughter. What is essentially men talking in rooms for three and a half hours has never felt so compelling, with the storytelling and characters showing an intelligence and complexity, not least for the existential emptiness. 'The Irishman' truly is cinema at its finest.
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1
'ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD'
Boy did Quentin Tarantino - and I - have fun with this one. You get the sense that every project Tarantino takes on is a passion project of sorts, but arguably none more so than this. A love letter to his upbringing in 1960s Hollywood, there's a sense of self-indulgence but a maturity in how he tells this story. Taking place in a dream-like sunny LA, there are so many memorable scenes. From Rick Dalton's (Leonardo DiCaprio) lesson in acting from a little girl to Cliff's (Brad Pitt) fight with Bruce Lee, and who can forget the eerie and haunting visit to The Ranch? Not everything sticks upon landing, but aided by Robert Richardson's cinematography, this is an absolute belter of a buddy comedy. And to top it off, Paul Thomas Anderson had seen it eight times in its first month of release, so there's that.
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CHRIS DOS SANTOS
5
'FROZEN 2'
While it's much weaker than the phenomenal original film, I'd be lying if I didn't say I loved it. Elsa has to be one of my favourite Disney characters, and her journey of self-discovery was fantastic and grabbed me emotionally. While the music lacks, both 'Into the Unknown' and 'Show Yourself' have being playing non-stop since seeing it on the 28th November.
READ THE REVIEW
4
'TOP END WEDDING'
This is easily my favourite Australian film of all time. Not only is this a beautiful representation of our country, it is hilariously funny and so heartfelt.
READ THE REVIEW
3
'THE IRISHMAN'
To say I was hesitant about a Martin Scorsese Netflix film - and add to that a few years of delay and development hell - to get a final product as profound and moving as what the film turned out to be is something to be celebrated. It's a beautiful, heartbreaking send-off to the Scorsese's earlier works as well as De Niro, Pesci and Pacino.
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2
'HUSTLERS'
What easily could have been a "Woo, lady stripers!" film, 'Hustlers' somehow become one of 2019's best films. You've heard it over and over but J-Lo is absolutely fantastic, with her performance as Ramona one to go down in the history books. This is the only movie I've seen twice in the same day, and I feel that speaks loudly as to how powerful and gripping this story is.
1
'BOOKSMART'
I swear to God, I can't stop talking about this masterpiece. Oliva Wilde is a genius and the way she uses the medium of film is jaw-dropping; there isn't a creative beat missed. Beanie Feldstein and Kaitlyn Dever are phenomenal, as is every single supporting actor - from Gigi to George and Principal Brown, everyone is hilarious. I can watch this movie non-stop till I die.
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JESSICA FENTON
5
'MID90s'
Remember when Jonah Hill was that weird guy is 'The 40-Year-Old Virgin' who just wanted to buy a pair of platform boots? He had one scene in that movie. One. 14 years later and he's a two-time Academy Award nominee, an in-demand actor for both comedic and dramatic roles and he's finally, finally gifted us with his feature film directorial debut. With a small budget and a cast of young people who had never been in front of a camera before, Hill produced a deeply personal and emotional coming-of-age story using skateboarding as its spoon full of sugar. Directing his young cast of uniquely-named characters to beautiful performances, Hill proved that his gifts are more than meets the eye, and that he is an incredibly exciting new filmmaker to watch out for.
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4
'AVENGERS: ENDGAME'
Alright! Alright! Boo, hiss and roll your eyes at me all you want, but this film was the end of a decade-long journey for me consisting of 23 films equaling 2,868 viewing minutes (actually more because I have seen them all many times). If you want to sit there and claim that this film (or films) "aren't cinema" or whatever then fine, because the truth is they're more than that - they're a lifestyle, even going so far as a religious experience for some. And by all means, continue to scoff and tell us that box office figures don't mean quality. Sure, yeah, you may be right, it's better than quality, it's Want. 'Parasite' is, of course, a "better" film, but the entire world didn't want to see 'Parasite', they wanted to see 'Avengers: Endgame'. Disney, Marvel Studios and these films are not the enemy, they're simply giving the people what they want. What they've achieved over the past decade is unprecedented and so far unparalleled (suck it DCEU!). You've at least got to given them props for that.
READ THE REVIEW
3
'JOJO RABBIT'
There is nothing actor/writer/director Taika Waititi could do that I wouldn't crawl through fire to see (except 'The Mandalorian' - 'Star Wars' just isn't for me), and 'Jojo Rabbit' is no exception. Imagine an opportunity to laugh at Adolf Hilter!? This genius filmmaker has given us that very opportunity. You get to laugh and cry and cry while laughing and laugh with crying. This hilarious, satirical and exquisite film about young love, choices and hope is truely something special.
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2
'ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD'
Many called it too long, too boring and with just a hint of racism. Sure, for the bulk of its 161-minute run time it didn't deliver on Tarantino's usual blood-splattered, cuss-ladened mega scenes; instead, this modern-day bard took a different approach - telling a proper story. Not his first foray into rewriting history, 2009's 'Inglorious Basterds' saw Hitler finally getting bested by his enemies, and 'Once Upon A Time In Hollywood' showcased once again what could have happened if evil prevailed. With impeccable casting as always and a script you can sink your teeth into, Tarantino delivered. Perhaps not in the way people wanted, but in the way we needed.
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1
'BOOKSMART'
Is there anything better than a teen comedy? Gone are the days of young women forced to watch movies about gross sex pacts and male masterbation. Enter feature debut director Olivia Wilde and her merry band of sensational, talented women to show us how it should be done. 'Booksmart' is impossibly smart, hysterically funny, topical, and finally showcases female friendships and interactions without bitchiness and backstabbing. And to complete this allrounder there's even an LGBT+ thread. Mwah! Perfection.
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ASHLEY TERESA
5
'VOX LUX'
'Spring Breakers', Harmony Korine's accomplished but polarising film from 2013, painted the modern cultural landscape as one where violence and pop music share a more indelible relationship than we might have ever thought, and this relationship is explored in even more detail in 'Vox Lux'. Forebodingly narrated by Willem Dafoe, 'Vox Lux' is dramatic and compelling in equal measure, a thriller in a league of its own. Plus, Natalie Portman in a glittery jumpsuit. What more could you want? (Full disclosure: Florence Pugh's Instagram stories about her pet cactus originally took this spot, but sadly they don't count.)
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4
'HIGH LIFE'
French auteur Claire Denis begins her English language filmography with this stellar and striking entry into the science fiction genre. The imagery in this film is haunting both in its beauty and its horror that it feels like filmmaking from some higher power, mirroring duality of what it means to be human, and what happens when our darkest inhibitions are let loose. 'High Life' also proves yet again that Robert Pattinson is one of the most exciting and diverse actors of our time. Expect this one to stay with you long after the credits.
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3
'PARASITE'
Anyone who has spent more than ten minutes with me since June has inevitably had me chew their ear off about 'Parasite' - it's just that good. It's a biting satire of class structure that needs to be seen to be believed, and somehow miraculously holds up on multiple watches, even when you know all the unpredictable (and quite frankly batshit insane) twists of the second half (and that's all I'll say because this is the perfect film to watch with no prior knowledge... you'll thank me later). Director Bong Joon-ho is truly a master of gripping cinema. Believe the snowballing hype 'Parasite' is getting as we enter awards season and prepare to be blown away.
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2
'PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE'
It's not every day that a movie sends me into doubled over, hysterical sobbing for its final half-hour (this actually happened) - but then again, 'Portrait of A Lady on Fire' is no ordinary film. This understated French lesbian romance set in the 18th century may not seem accessible, but it speaks to the universality of how we remember those we have loved and lost, and the role art plays in preserving or meddling with those memories. 'Portrait' was also shot in 8K resolution, which bleeds texture and colour into every frame and renders the film as a piece of art itself. If you've ever loved someone, there is something in this movie for you. Don't be surprised if this is hailed as a modern classic in years to come.
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1
'MARRIAGE STORY'
Who would've thought that the best horror film of 2019 would come from Noah Baumbach, a man renowned for exclusively covering existential crises of upper-middle-class white people throughout his career? I covered what I love about 'Marriage Story' over a month ago in my review (and I've since bumped my rating up to 5 stars), but my words can truly never do justice to this equally heartbreaking and heartwarming film about a gruelling divorce. It is scored, acted and edited to perfection, raising the bar for Netflix films through the roof. It brims with tiny details and symbols that make rewatches super rewarding, and is a film I hold incredibly close to my heart. If there is any justice in the world, Adam Driver will be going home with the Best Actor Oscar come February.
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DANIEL LAMMIN
5
'MIDSOMMAR: THE DIRECTOR'S CUT'
His theatrical cut was brilliant, but Ari Aster's longer version of his twisted folk tale is a full-blown horror masterpiece. If 'Marriage Story' looks at the end of a relationship as a chamber piece, 'Midsommar' enacts it as an opera, a primal ritual of death and destruction, of purging and purifying, of madness and bone-crushing grief. In its director's cut, it becomes a staggering horror epic, and a rare case of wild ambition that exceeds expectations, held together by a powerhouse performance from the indestructible Florence Pugh.
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4
'MARRIAGE STORY'
The end of a relationship is a catastrophe, but a quiet one, where the elemental destruction occurs so deep and we feel unable to share it with others. With gentle and humane simplicity, Noah Baumbach captures the pain and absurdity that comes with the end of a relationship, that state of total emotional confusion and fear. It's a film of quiet sorrow and gentle hope, an elegy for love lost that gives itself the room to grieve and where no one is the hero or the villain. Neither Adam Driver nor Scarlett Johansson have ever been better.
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3
'PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE'
This isn't a film, it's a force of nature, a sensorially and emotionally overwhelming miracle of a film that left me reeling, my jaw agape in awe of it. Céline Sciamma has created a romantic masterpiece for the ages, a work of staggering power built around two sublime central performances from Noémie Merlant and Adèle Haenel, and the kind of cinematography you only dream about. It's like being caught in the purest of cinematic and romantic dreams, and the effect of it never leaves you.
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2
'PARASITE'
There's kind of nothing you can really say that can comprehend what an absolute jaw-dropping masterpiece 'Parasite' is; it's Bong Joon-Ho's magnum opus. It actually plays beautifully in conversation with 'Burning', also offering a damning statement on class but through the lens of satire. There's not a thing out of place in this practically perfect film, and if there's any justice, the Oscar for Best Picture will be in its bloodied hands very soon.
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1
'BURNING'
The first time I saw Lee Chang-dong's 'Burning', it left little impression on me. The second time through, it decimated me. This is a perfect engine of a film, a hypnotic and horrifying portrait of male power and class, featuring three remarkable central performances and direction so precise that it slices the skin. There's something monumental about 'Burning', about its slowly revealing mystery and its mastery of the craft of cinema. Not only my favourite film of the year, but I think one of the best films of the decade.
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JAKE WATT
5
'MIDSOMMAR'
A couple, Dani (Florence Pugh) and Christian (Jack Reynor), travels to Sweden to visit a rural hometown's fabled mid-summer festival. What begins as an idyllic retreat quickly devolves into an increasingly violent and bizarre competition at the hands of a pagan cult. Ari Aster's second feature isn't really a horror film; it's an ethreal, nauseous, funny and claustrophobic fable about family, the start and end of relationships, and processing grief. The less you assume going in, the more you'll appreciate it. You won't be scared - you'll be grabbed and shaken mercilessly. Beautifully filmed, with unique cinematography, trippy psychedelic visuals and a raw performance from Florence Pugh, perhaps the most horrific aspect of this movie is that it makes a creepy cult lifestyle seem appealing.
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4
'AD ASTRA'
There was a sombre self-seriousness to 'Ad Astra', James Gray's hypnotic space drama, that belies its silliness. Brad Pitt's Roy McBride discovers his father, Clifford (Tommy Lee Jones), who presumably vanished during a journey to Neptune, isn't actually dead. In fact, he could be up to some nefarious space shit. Lazily described by many as 'Apocalypse Now' in space, it actually felt like a less cerebral, more adventurous 'Interstellar', with moon buggy shoot-outs, killer baboons and zero-gravity knife fights. The worlds beyond Earth in 'Ad Astra' are beautifully rendered via epic sound design, awe-inspiring futuristic infrastructure and larger-than-life vistas - one of Gray's goals was to create "the most realistic depiction of space travel that's been put in a movie". It's 'Dan Dare' for fans of arthouse film.
READ THE REVIEW
3
'THE IRISHMAN'
It's always a big deal when 77-year-old Martin Scorsese makes a movie that involves mobsters in some way, like when Tim Burton makes a movie with Johnny Depp wearing a wig or when George Lucas makes a movie with robots. 'The Irishman' is a masterful, meditative, three-and-a-half-hour crime epic about real-life gangster Frank "The Irishman" Sheeran (Robert De Niro), crime lord Russell Bufalino (Joe Pesci) and labour union leader Jimmy Hoffa (Al Pacino). Scorsese's film is based on 'I Heard You Paint Houses', Charles Brandt's non-fiction book in which Sheeran - on his death bed - recounted his life to the author, including details of the hits he allegedly carried out for the Bufalino crime family. Sheeran also claims to know exactly what happened to Jimmy Hoffa, the notorious Teamster leader who disappeared in 1975. It's like if Forrest Gump was a murderous thug sitting at a bus stop, meditating on morality and how life is pointless and it fucks us all over in the end. The de-ageing of the cast via CGI is also genuinely amazing - they really do succeed in making Robert de Niro look like a young Samuel L. Jackson.
READ THE REVIEW
2
'ASH IS PUREST WHITE'
Chinese filmmaker Jia Zhangke, perhaps best known for 'Still Life' and 'A Touch of Sin', reunites with his wife and frequent muse Zhao Tao for his latest drama. Beginning in post-industrial Datong in 2001, the film hops across three different timeframes to follow Tao as Qiao, a woman in a relationship with a gangster (Liao Fan). I can't even begin to figure out how many fully-contained genre pieces Zhangke shoves into this magnificent monster of a movie - it's an epic romantic crime drama that contains the most visceral fight scene of the year and examines matters of loyalty, sacrifice, and disillusionment, with Zhangke arriving at emotional truths that aren't always spoken by the characters.
1
'PARASITE'
The low-class Kim family (a team of grifters led by a patriarch, played by Song Kang-ho) latches upon the wealthy Park family. But the Kims' new place in the extremely comfortable lives of the Parks means some stark clarity is thrown on where they rank in the hierarchy of South Korea, a highly competitive society where success is valued above all. All too often, explicitly political art fails as both art and politics. Socialists shouldn't put up with shonky imitations of popular genres, nor with political messages denuded of anything but the lowest common denominator. What makes 'Parasite' so satisfying is that it commits neither error. It is an engrossing, stylish and near-perfect movie, and its underlying themes go beyond merely pointing out class exploitation to challenge the logic of capital. Bong Joon-ho's film is clearly made by a director working at the height of his powers - a breezy dark comedy that gradually swells with rage and melancholy, becoming a sociological thriller with a horror film vibe.
READ THE REVIEW
LILY MEEK
5
'KNIVES OUT'
A fun, whacky and unpredictable murder mystery. It truly does honour Agatha Christie and her writing, creating a dynamic story that keeps you guessing the entire way. It's a fantastic cast with great wit and perfect timing.READ THE REVIEW
4
'BOOKSMART'
'Booksmart' is the coming-of-age film we've been waiting for. As a young female, watching this film was both refreshing and relieving. I finally got to see a film with two female protagonists who were also hilarious! The film doesn't shy away from confronting real issues of identity and it is completely unapologetic, embracing everything these sorts of films should. Olivia Wilde has delivered us an absolute gem of a journey.
READ THE REVIEW
3
'MARRIAGE STORY'
'Marriage Story' is the most honest film I have ever seen. To personify its narrative - it's as if this film has the capability to empathise with anyone in a broken relationship or going through a divorce. Noah Baumbach shows us just how emotionally intelligent he is, by giving us a reality and portal into understanding the complexity of changing relationships - it will make you think, it will make you feel, and it will make you be thankful.
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2
'ASK DR RUTH'
'Ask Dr Ruth' is just delightful. It's so worth watching if only to see Dr Ruth Westheimer on screen. This woman has endured great hardships, learned all she could, and been courageous through it all. Now in this documentary, she is probably the most courageous she has ever been - choosing to be completely vulnerable with the world. This is the documentary of Ruth Westheimer and her tale to becoming America's greatest and most beloved sex therapist.
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1
'JOJO RABBIT'
This film is genius. Taika Waititi has the power to make sad things funny and bring out great performances from kids. This film has you giggling at the utmost inappropriate jokes, but gives you permission to do so. What's even better, Waititi embraces his style to new heights within this film and doesn't try to be or do anything that's not himself. It looked like fun to make, and you can feel that whilst watching. It's a masterpiece!
READ THE REVIEW
CHARLIE DAVID PAGE
5
'ASK DR RUTH'
This was a very last-minute addition to my list, but after hearing about it following its premiere at Sundance early this year, I knew I had to watch this documentary. Charting the life of Holocaust survivor and preeminent sex therapist Dr Ruth Westheimer, its charm comes from Dr Ruth's beautiful demeanour and passion for life, even at the age of 90.
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4
'EIGHTH GRADE'
Sneaking into the early part of Australia's 2019 release calendar, this is such a wonderfully raw coming-of-age story. With a stunning central performance from Elsie Fisher, it's a complicated tale about growing up and the moments of struggle to get there. The story's relatability, regardless of age or gender, is its most powerful weapon.
READ THE REVIEW
3
'PARASITE'
The global success of this South Korean film might seem like a bit of a surprise until you notice Bong Joon-ho's name in the credits. The director of 'Okja' and 'Snowpiercer' has crafted a family drama that's murkily dark and uncomfortably humorous. With a terrifically cast family ensemble, it's such a smart, stylish and shocking film that fluctuates between drama, comedy and thriller.
READ THE REVIEW
2
'KNIVES OUT'
I love murder mysteries, so it's absolutely no surprise that this found its way so far up my list for 2019. With a fresh twist on the detective genre and a stellar ensemble cast, it's just so much fun - I cannot emphasise how much of a breath of fresh air this was on the 2019 cinematic landscape! Just watch it and you'll agree.
READ THE REVIEW
1
'JUDY & PUNCH'
This was a huge surprise for me... an Australian film that doesn't deal with themes that leave me depressed? Add to that an exciting new local female filmmaking voice in Mirrah Foulkes telling a story through the eyes of a strong female protagonist and you'll understand why this was such a hit at the Sydney Film Festival. Include a top-notch Aussie cast led by Mia Wasikowska and Damon Herriman and you have yourself a damn good time.
READ THE REVIEW
BRENT DAVIDSON
5
'TOY STORY 4'
Everything you'd expect from a Pixar film. The animation is slick and the story is good; there were funny moments and there were terrifying moments, but all in all, it was a heartfelt journey from start to finish. Personally, I didn't think another film in this franchise was necessary, but apparently money talks and money walks, so I guess it was inevitable.
READ THE REVIEW
4
'SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME'
Another fine addition to the 'Spider-Man' series that is proving they have finally picked the right actor to play Peter Parker. It's classic Marvel and is a totally fun ride from start to finish. Despite what others might say, I had a fun time and got exactly what I wanted from this superhero movie - sue me!
READ THE REVIEW
3
'CAPTAIN MARVEL'
"Oh my god Brent, did you see anything that wasn't Disney!?" You are all crying. The answer is yes, I definitely did, but I didn't see so many films that the non-Disney films made the list. 'Captain Marvel' is ladies kicking butt meets the fantastic Marvel magic, Brie Larson is great and I'm excited to watch the new phase of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
READ THE REVIEW
2
'AVENGERS: ENDGAME'
Another Marvel Movie?! Yes, but this one could be considered one of the cultural events of our time. It's a huge film in time, star-power and money that was pumped into it. It's impossible to ignore what is now the highest-grossing cinematic release ever. It's everything we expect from a Marvel film at its most explosive and exciting, and I was glued to my seat from start to finish. What a way to finish the Infinity War saga.
READ THE REVIEW
1
'POKEMON: DETECTIVE PIKACHU'
How could the first-ever live-action Pokémon film not make my number one spot for the year? I laugh, I cried, I felt like a child again. I whispered "thank you, Pikachu" to a person in a costume at the premiere that was a little more than just "thanks for the photo." 'Detective Pikachu' hit the nail on the head, it provided fan service, it helped introduce newcomers to the world of Pokémon, it delighted fans old and new. I honestly went in wanting to like the film (animated Pokémon movies are sometimes sketchy at best - not the first one! - but others) and I walked out a blubbery mess who loved it. Pika Pika!
READ THE REVIEW

We're also celebrating the top films of the past decade - click here to read the SWITCH team's top five films of 2010 to 2019!

TRENDINGSCOUTS GUIDE TO THE ZOMBIE APOCALYPSEFairly brainless
TRENDINGWIN A CHRISTMAS GIFT FROM BOBA true story of the festive spirit
TRENDINGPOCAHONTAS25 years later, the colours of the wind are fading
TRENDINGJALLIKATTUVisually stunning and absurdly funny sociopolitical critique
TRENDINGMONTY PYTHON'S FLYING CIRCUS: THE COMPLETE SERIESSketches at a revolution
TRENDINGRAMSBaaa-ck off
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