THE BEST OF THE DECADE

CELEBRATING THE TOP FILMS FROM 2010 TO 2019

YEAR IN REVIEW
By Charlie David Page
25th December 2019

The past decade has seen some incredible advances in cinematic storytelling, with handfuls of films that have become instant classics. The SWITCH team has taken up the difficult task of choosing their top five films across the entire decade - it's been quite a challenge, and the results are a hugely varied mix!

The only rules: it can only be five films, and it has to have been released in Australian cinemas between 2010 and 2019. Take a look for yourself and let us know what you think!

JUMP TO...

JESSICA FENTON
5
'EASY A' (2010)
This is the movie that gave us Emma Stone. Sure she'd been in 'Superbad' and 'Zombieland' before this, but it was 'Easy A' that showed that world that this woman was a movie star - and funny as hell too! 'Easy A' earned Emma her first Golden Globe nomination, and the film won the Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Comedy. Why? Because it's a fucking awesome film and you should all stop questioning my impeccable taste! It also has Amanda Bynes in it as a psychotic Christian. Case. Closed!
4
'BLACKFISH' (2013)
Everyone's social conscience has grown a little stronger over the last decade, and I'd like to think that it started with a whale. When 'Blackfish' first arrived in limited cinemas, it through word of mouth that really got the ball rolling. Because that's what movies should do - teach and inform, whether it's on an emotional or factual level. Not everyone may have seen 'Blackfish' in cinemas, but they sure as hell have heard about it. Try driving past a Sea World today without seeing signs and protestors. This documentary changed lives. It changed corporations. It changed legislation. What more could you ask for to be considered a great film?
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3
'THE SOCIAL NETWORK' (2010)
Our lives - I say "our", but really I mean "your" because I've literally never been on Facebook - have been ruled by the social media giant for the past decade. You can't do anything, go anywhere or find out information without Facebook being involved somehow. So it was only a matter of time before someone told the story of this social media phenomena - and who better than master filmmaker David Fincher? Never one to shy away from the dark underbelly of life, this tale of ego, underhandedness, betrayal and a hint of ill-conceived romance was perfect. So while the world awaits the next origin story as to how some regular Joe got his superpowers, the ultimate origin story has been in our midst this entire time. In collaboration with one of the greatest screenwriters in history, Aaron Sorkin, this Academy Award-winning film exposed Facebook's dirty beginnings and while shocked, the masses were also transfixed to such a degree as we discovered that everyone's moral compass was just a little off true north here. With great power comes great responsibility, and as we've learned since its inception and thanks to 'The Social Network', Mark Zuckerberg is possibly the worst person to hold that power.
2
'CALL ME BY YOUR NAME' (2017)
Seriously! If you're questioning why this exquisite film is on my list then either A) you haven't seen it. Or B) you have seen it, didn't like it and we can no longer be friends.
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1
'THE WOLF OF WALL STREET' (2013)
Everyone was sure that this was finally going to bring Leo his long-awaited Oscar. It didn't. That came two years later, but between Jordan Belfort and "that guy who got mauled by a bear", which one are people going to remember him for the most? Both a critical and commercial success, 'The Wolf of Wall Street' gave cinema-going audiences some of the best scenes and performances of the last decade. Not much can beat a Martin Scorsese film (except '12 Years A Slave' at the 2014 Oscars, apparently) but not today, sir! Best film of the decade!
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ASHLEY TERESA
5
'GOOD TIME' (2017)
Admittedly, the stunning 'Inside Llewyn Davis' occupied this final spot for quite some time, but it would be wrong to deny the impact 'Good Time' has had on what I expect from my thrillers - and films in general - since its release in 2017. The best way to describe 'Good Time' is as a neon-lit, anxiety-soaked crime caper that sucks you in, housing a pounding synth score, gritty cinematography that never lets up in its intensity, and some of Robert Pattinson's best work ever. It is easily one of the best thrillers of the decade and needs to be seen by more people (it's now streaming on Netflix so get to it)!
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4
'THE SOCIAL NETWORK' (2010)
It's impossible to imagine what the 21st century would be like without Facebook, and love or loathe its creator Mark Zuckerberg, his meteoric rise to power is a thoroughly entertaining one, the kind of story perfect for cinematic dissection. Jesse Eisenberg miraculously embraces playing the villain in his own film, and the razor-sharp wit of the script makes for a caustic experience that I will never tire of. Not only is 'The Social Network' the finest film David Fincher has released this decade, but it's also a quintessential portrait of American culture and its relationship with technology.
3
'HER' (2013)
It's always fun to joke about what would happen if someone fell in love with Siri, but I don't think anyone could have expected a film to explore the idea with such delicacy and rawness as 'Her' does. Visually, it feels like the artsiest Kodak commercial of all time, and emotionally, its exploration of love, loss and loneliness lands like a gut punch, leaving me in tears every time. Each cast member is at the top of their game - even Olivia Wilde makes an impact with her minuscule screen time - but major props go to Scarlett Johansson as sentient operating system Samantha, channelling a world of emotions simply through her voice.
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2
'WHIPLASH' (2014)
One rainy day in 2014, I decided to skip class and see 'Whiplash', a film that at the time was slowly gaining awards traction (it would go on to be nominated for six Oscars and win three). 107 minutes later, I felt like I had been holding my breath the entire time, an even more astonishing feat considering it's about drumming in a jazz band, of all things. The precision that protagonist Andrew (Miles Teller) is pushed and abused towards is reflected in this film's flawless composition (oh my god, that editing!), reaching his physical, mental and emotional limits in ways that would rival the most steel-faced of thrillers. 'Whiplash' put Damien Chazelle on my radar in a major way, and I am forever grateful for it leading me to my favourite film of the decade.
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1
'LA LA LAND' (2016)
The avalanche of remakes and reboots released this decade points to nostalgia as Hollywood's hottest trend, but one film managed to tap into that nostalgia while being entirely its own unique experience. Words cannot ever accurately describe what 'La La Land' means to me, but I'll try my best. This film feels like true love. It's comforting, it's whimsical, it's colourful, it's heartbreaking, and it's real, all at the same time. The struggles of jazz pianist Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) and his actress paramour Mia (a role that earned Emma Stone her first Oscar) might not be the most relatable, but their pursuit of their dreams and the sacrifices that entails speaks to a universal and human struggle to achieve your dreams. This is writer/director Damien Chazelle's passion project, and that passion and love bleeds into every frame. I don't know if I'll ever find another film that I connect with on the same level as I've connected with 'La La Land', but honestly? I'm okay with that.
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JOEL KALKOPF
5
'PADDINGTON 2' (2017)
Why can't 'Paddington 2' be on my list?? Literally, everything about this movie is pure sweetness, and for that reason, it belongs here. Irrelevant of mood, time, or even company, this movie will absolutely put a smile on your face. It's so joyous and infectious with its warmth and heart, making it the feel-good film of the decade. There's even a character called Knuckles McGinty, for heaven's sake! The comedy is funny, the action is suspenseful, and the message that little acts of kindness can make a difference is something this world could use a lot more of. A special shout-out must go to Hugh Grant, who is at career-best form - and yes, I'm saying that even as a Richard Curtis fan.
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4
'CALL ME BY YOUR NAME' (2017)
I didn't know you could feel an Italian countryside summer's day when watching a movie. The senses come alive in this seductive atmosphere, as Elio and Oliver's love blossoms over the course of a summer holiday. The tranquillity of the environment perfectly complements Luca Guadagino's choices, especially the soft dreamlike score that, like the scenes it accompanies, lingers and holds your attention. 'Call Me by Your Name' captures and bottles that feeling of infatuation, in a dreamy almost memory-like visual texture. Michael Stuhlbarg's monologue to his son is one for the ages, and the sheer heartbreak in the final shot of the film stays with you for a very long time.
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3
'THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL' (2014)
A tale within a tale within a tale within a tale. Wes Anderson gets a lot of shtick these days for over-stylising, but I refuse to believe the same can be said for this one. With each viewing, the depth shines through as more layers are unfolded. There are nations plunged into war, refugees, the rise of fascism, and whilst they may be drawn together with whimsy set pieces, they are not distanced or distracted from. The style plays a function, matching the tone and narrative of the film with respect and dignity, so much so that you can't help but be taken by the story. I love the characters and the weight of the storytelling because as with all of Anderson's films, it's enchanting and colourful, but all with a melancholy undertone that fits like a manicured glove.
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2
'BLADE RUNNER 2049' (2017)
This is one of those movie-going experiences I'll remember for the rest of my life. I remember sitting in my chair as the credits rolled down, awestruck by what I had just witnessed. Everything Denis Villeneuve put on screen is breathtaking in this moody, atmospheric piece of art. The set and sound design choices bring a dystopian LA to life, expanding on Scott's world just enough to compliment his original scope. On a purely technical level this is a great film, but under the masterful Villeneuve, it becomes one of the best of the decade. Whether it is or isn't better than the original (it is) doesn't matter; what matters is how damn pretty it all is. Every frame is a painting worth a thousand words.
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1
'LA LA LAND' (2016)
The first is obvious, isn't it? Just by reading the title, you've probably started whistling any one of the catchy tunes found on Hurwitz's soundtrack. Damien Chazelle had the keys to Hollywood after the success of 'Whiplash', and he chose an original musical. The confidence of that man! 'La La Land' beautifully captures the essence of the classic musicals of the "Golden Age", but it does so much more than just pay homage. Part devastating, part fairytale, old and new techniques come together for a moving and unforgettable movie experience. The first half of the film transports us to a magical world that, slowly over the course of the film, turns more realistic and honest. The chemistry between Gosling and Stone is *chef's kiss*, and who can forget that epilogue?? I know recently this movie has seen some hate, but Ryan Gosling can "Jazz-splain" to me any day.
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DANIEL LAMMIN
5
'CALL ME BY YOUR NAME' (2017)
It filled my heart to bursting and broke it to pieces. It made me fall in love for the first time again and reel from the shock of losing love for the first time again. It called to the deepest of forgotten memories, of first touches and first kisses, of first longings and first desires. The audience disappeared and it was just me and this film alone in the cinema, communing together, holding one another while I sobbed with joy in its arms while it whispered gently that it is okay to be alive, that no matter how hard it can feel, it is okay to be alive. Sobbing with joy in the arms of this miracle of a film.
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4
'THE SOCIAL NETWORK' (2010)
The great work of cinema on the world we live in now, how it came to be and the devastation it left in its path, on the folly and hubris of man and how it can lead us tumbling into the abyss. It's a monument, a leviathan, a prophecy, a drama of Shakespearean proportions, a comedy of deep human horror, a significant moment in American cinema that will be counted as one of its truly great works. I still don't think we've fully comprehended what a truly staggering work this film is.
3
'THE WIND RISES' (2013)
The art of animation as an act of poetry, a portrait of an artist grappling to understand the truth of his creations, created by an artist grappling to understand the truths of his own. It's a masterwork from one of the greatest filmmakers of all time, a film so deeply personal that you feel you are looking into the depths of a human soul, one where dream and reality flow together in a breathtaking and devastating symphony. To watch it is to be in awe at the act of being alive.
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2
'BURNING' (2019)
It cuts like a scalpel, punches you in the face, sets the hairs standing on the back of your neck. Within its calibrated frames, the desires of men become acts of careful destruction, where power is wielded over those lesser, not out of desperation but out of sickening and horrifying boredom. A perfect engine of cinema, staggering in its execution, overwhelming in its impact, impossible to forget.
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1
'MOONLIGHT' (2016)
There's nothing more I can say. I don't think I'll ever recover from it. I don't think it'll ever stop haunting me. This film is what it means to be a human being - to live, to die, to love, to be loved, to hate, to desire, to know where you belong, to long to belong to someone. It's a perfect film. There hasn't been one better this decade.
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CHRIS DOS SANTOS
5
'WONDER WOMAN' (2017)
Back in 2017, not only was a good DC movie a thing of the past, but a female-led superhero movie was literally something that had never succeeded before - and 'Wonder Woman' does on every level. Witnessing the now-iconic No Man's Land scene was something I'll never forget - I was shaking and crying and excited; it was every emotion all at once. While the third act may slip, I don't care. This is not only a powerful film, but easily my favourite superhero film of all time.
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4
'CREED' (2015)
After finishing my HSC and being a little clueless about what to do the next year, I went into a deep dive of watching everything that was playing in cinemas, and 'Creed' was one of them. I'd never seen 'Rocky', went in very blind and was blown away. Adonis' story was oddly relatable, and both the training scene and final fight are some of my all-time favourite cinematic moments. The score, the music, the acting, the directing - there is anything I don't love.
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3
'GONE GIRL' (2014)
Wow, wow, wow, I can watch this film a hundred times and still be blown away, even knowing the twist. Amy Dunn is the perfect character that you love to hate. I love Fincher's aesthetic and just the whole craftsman shift of the film; there isn't a moment wasted, it's so captivating on every level.
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2
'MOANA' (2016)
'The Princess and the Frog' made the Disney Princess formula modern, 'Tangled' brought them to the CGI world, 'Frozen' capitalised on the modern trend, but Moana perfected it. I adore this film (note the trend of strong independent women), the music is some of Disney's best, the animation stunning, and Moana's journey of self-discovery (is that another trend on this list?) is so powerful and moving that it's something people of every age can relate to. As a Disney fanboy, this rivals my love of the classics and is up there with the animated 'Beauty and the Beast' and 'The Lion King'.
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1
'LOVE, SIMON' (2018)
Speaking of self-discovery, it's cliché to say a movie changed my life, but the impact 'Love, Simon' had on me is profound. I unapologetically love this film - not only what it stands for, but just as a heartwarming teen film. One thing that I think that goes under-appreciated is the soundtrack crafted by Jack Antonoff's band Bleachers for the film, perfectly reflecting every emotion Simon is going through. One my favourite things outside of Simon's journey is the the fully-realised world they have created - the school, his family and friends, it all feels like real people and adds to the beauty of this masterpiece.
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JAKE WATT
5
'UNCLE BOONMEE WHO CAN RECALL HIS PAST LIVES' (2011)
Ghost wives and smooth-talking catfish providing oral pleasure - these are but a few examples of the spiritual weirdness offered by 'Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives'. The film focuses on Boonmee who, in his last dying days, is cared for by his nephew and sister-in-law before he is visited by his deceased wife and his long-missing son Boonsong (now a hirsute monkey specter with glowing red eyes). Director Apichatpong Weerasethakul's tender spiritual vision is grounded in compassion for those taking a brief detour through our mortal realm. The film operates on a logic-defying emotional wavelength, one that accepts the porous borders between worlds and reincarnated lives. It's a fever dream that inches forward at glacial speed with a disparate nonlinear narrative, yet, somehow, it draws you to the story at the most visceral level.
4
'HER' (2013)
The near-future story of a sad guy (Joaquin Phoenix) who enters into a romantic relationship with his computer's operating system (expressively embodied - sans body - by Scarlett Johansson) should look sillier or scarier as real-life technology threatens to catch up with it. But while this sci-fi romance from Spike Jonze has funny moments, Jonze takes his material seriously - not as a cautionary tale or an indictment of male entitlement, but as a sensitive, open-hearted relationship story about one partner growing beyond another. I think it's Jonze's best work, and certainly his most sincere. 'Her' is phenomenal because it ponders the question of how we as humans define love, reminding you of your own vulnerability and humanity in the process.
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3
'THE HANDMAIDEN' (2016)
The plot, pulled from a Sarah Waters' novel, appears to follow a young pickpocket (Kim Tae-ri) hired to help a nefarious con artist (Ha Jung-woo) seduce a seemingly fragile aristocrat (Kim Min-hee). But even the ulterior motives have ulterior motives in director Park Chan-wook's kinky, opulent, blackly funny thriller - each part of it turns what you think you know on its head without ever making you feel cheated or like it's trying to one-up itself. Park and his co-conspirators - the two Kims in particular - expertly deceive their audience again and again, pulling the rug out in a magnificent con. It's easy to become swept up in his stylistic flourishes, expert manipulation of plot, and perfect pacing, but the real surprise lies not in the twists or the finger-maiming violence; it's in the sweetness and romantic sincerity. Sex is so intrinsically tied to the spirit of the film that it deserves mention alongside everything else, like the acting, writing, score, set design, unpredictability, and the unsettling and beautiful imagery. This movie has it all.
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2
'UNDER THE SKIN' (2014)
Jonathan Glazer's film is light on dialogue and heavy on dread, stripping back the plot of Michael Faber's novel to the barest essentials. Scarlett Johansson stars as the nameless alien seductress who prowls the streets of Glasgow, drugging men and harvesting their meat for her home planet. Slowly, she comes to develop a sense of humanity: to be vulnerable, to be hunted, to feel fear, to be taken care of by others, to be loved. Glazer surreptitiously filmed Johansson's encounters and flirtations with real men to ensure they resonate with all the curiosity and giddiness one might feel when getting picked up by, well, someone that looks like Scarlett Johansson. The inky pit that indifferently swallows her targets frighteningly embodies Glazer's themes of loneliness and isolation. There's also, of course, Mica Levi's violent, viola-forward score. Movies like this take time to sink in. When they do, they linger incessantly.
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1
'UPSTREAM COLOR' (2013)
I love films that leave ambiguity for the viewer to solve or fill in with theory. I love open-ended films where we get to decide how things conclude based upon the journey we just witnessed. There is a chasm of difference between a director holding the audience's hand and making a film so intentionally opaque and obtuse that most are left to wonder WTF happened after the first act - 'Upstream Color' lives in a castle on a mountain top on the far side of that chasm. Shane Carruth's science fiction film emphasises intimacy and the natural world, its near-absence of discernible, meaningful dialogue serving to highlight its quiet, complex dance of trauma and recovery, not to mention its offbeat aesthetic pleasures and elliptical storytelling. Intelligent and thematically rich script aside, the movie is also a technical masterpiece - Carruth commands every aspect of the film, from the direction and writing to its score and distribution. The guy needs to make more movies ASAP but, with superheroes and Disney dominating the cinematic landscape, who knows when that will be?
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CHARLIE DAVID PAGE
5
'THE WAY WAY BACK' (2013)
I saw this on a whim at the 2013 Sydney Film Festival, and was completely enamoured by it. Respectfully identifying the struggles of a teenager, particularly one affected by divorce, it's also a beautiful ode to summer holidays past. It's a wonderfully-assembled cast; Liam James is a marvellous lead, Toni Collette can do no wrong, you love to hate Steve Carell, and Allison Janney is simply hilarious. Funny, heartfelt and personal, the film is a journey of discovery, with a realisation that the most ordinary times are the most important.
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4
'LAST MEN IN ALEPPO' (2017)
This documentary is one of the most moving cinematic experiences I've ever encountered. Following the emergency services staff who work in Syria, despite the constant attacks in the titular city. It's heartbreaking as they persevere against the daily disaster and death, and remain committed to saving the lives of others as they put their own at risk. Startling and confronting, it's a wonder this documentary was able to capture these moments amidst the horror.
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3
'COCO' (2017)
If you want to feel the exhilaration and exuberance of life, watch 'Coco'. It's amazing that a story that journeys through the Land of the Dead is so full of joy. Pair that with a passion for music, the most colourful animation known to mankind, and an authenticity that's rare in Disney films, and you have a very special family experience. You'll be sucked in by its infectious music, loveable characters, wondrous world, and the personality of a small boy named Miguel who loves music more than anything else.
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2
'THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY' (2013)
With a sense of adventure and exploration that's so infrequently captured on film, this is a cinematic experience for lovers of travel. Shot beautifully by and starring Ben Stiller, it takes a short story and expands it for modern times. Showing that there's so much more to life than the four walls that enclose us, it's an inspiring and visually spectacular glimpse of the road less travelled.
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1
'BIRDMAN' (2015)
The return of Michael Keaton to cinematic greatness, this is a wildly ambitious and inarguably cool movie. An energetic, crazy offering from director Alejandro G. Iñárritu, choosing to present the film as one continuous shot makes you feel like you're a part of the drama. With a brilliant score and great cast including Emma Stone, Zach Galifianakis, Edward Norton and Naomi Watts, it's a marvellously bold slice of the past decade.
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LILY MEEK
5
'THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI' (2018)
This film is an immersive experience. Its intensity, life lessons, dark humour and in-depth character analysation are intelligently written and powerful. This film is a must-watch for the courageous study of themes and the discussion it sparks about grief, revenge and alliances.READ THE REVIEW
4
'THE KING'S SPEECH' (2010)
'The King's Speech' is noteworthy for its performances and its balance of entertainment and history. It's a story of challenge, persistence and unlikely friendship. A film that will have you biting your fingernails and cheering all the same. It's a universal story - and deserves to be universally loved!
3
'BOY' (2010)
'Boy' is one of Taika Waititi's first notable features. It captures the essence of Kiwi humour, culture and family. What's most amazing about this film is Waititi's capability to capture the sad within the humour. This film has you navigating feelings left, right and centre, but you can't help but fall in love with this charming independent and all it boasts.
2
'LA LA LAND' (2016)
The greatest thing captured in this film is its ability to translate the hearts, feelings and thoughts of every dreamer onto a screen. It's discussion on the fear of failure and the sacrifices along the journey make this story so relatable. It's powerful in the way it connects with viewers - and sparks a fire of passion to go for what you've always dreamed of.READ THE REVIEW
1
'ABOUT TIME' (2013)
This film has the most beautiful message. At its core, it portrays the gift of life and it's the only film that has ever managed to make me feel satisfied about living in the present. It makes you feel blessed to be given the opportunities, the family and the time we have. It teaches us to value what's most important and to never take anything for granted. To me, this film encapsulates the greatest message we could ever learn.
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BRENT DAVIDSON
5
'KEDI' (2017)
For subject matter alone, this documentary should be everyone's film of the decade. Following the stray cats of Istanbul and how they have changed the lives of the people who care for them in the most profound and beautiful way, it is no surprise this film made me laugh, cry and adopt a cat. Throw in some fantastic cinematography and you have yourself a purrfect film.
4
'SCOTT PILGRIM vs THE WORLD' (2010)
As someone who loves video games, comic books and movies, it's hard to find a film that combines all three so perfectly. The style and graphics are incredible, and there is no detail too small that is ignored. It's funny and kick-ass, and has some incredible talent in it. It's a film for nerds that will make all our nerdy little hearts sing with joy!
3
'HER' (2013)
For a film where one of the main characters is a disembodied voice, this is one of the most profoundly impactful films of the last decade. Humanity's reliance on technology, leading to obsession and love, strikes a chord with anyone who might have felt lonely and found solace and companionship in a digital world. Not only is it beautifully shot, the acting is sublime and heartbreaking. A film that will stay with you long after you've seen it.
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2
'SKYFALL' (2012)
Sam Mendes' triumph of a James Bond film, there was no denying that 'Skyfall' changed the perception of how you can make a Bond film, without losing anything that defines what a Bond film is. It's still cheeky and slightly camp with huge action and titalation, but it has such a strong sense of style, and it could easily stand alone without any other films. Judy Dench shines - as does Daniel Craig - and it's just a beautiful ride from start to finish.
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1
'TANGERINE' (2015)
For me, Tangerine was an explosion of film that broke tradition and canon, proving that you don't need Hollywood budgets or expensive equipment to make the most engaging cinema I've witnessed in a long time. Entirely shot on iPhone 5s, 'Tangerine' is almost an opera from start to finish. Dramatic, funny, all-too-real and gritty, the film also employs actual trans actors in the roles that are required and is so exceptionally diverse, and knowing this makes it even more of a joy to watch (whilst offering another big middle finger to Hollywood). Shift your views and see what was my best film of the decade.
READ THE REVIEW

We're also celebrating the top films of 2019 - click here to read the SWITCH team's top five films of the year!

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TRENDINGSCOUTS GUIDE TO THE ZOMBIE APOCALYPSEFairly brainless
TRENDINGNEVER RARELY SOMETIMES ALWAYSThe film every teenager needs to see
TRENDINGDIRT MUSICA typically flawed Tim Winton adaptation
TRENDING25 FREE-TO-WATCH SHORT HORROR FILMSThe scariest shorts we uncovered online
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