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REVIEW:

THE 100-YEAR-OLD MAN WHO CLIMBED OUT OF THE WINDOW AND DISAPPEARED

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By Jess Fenton, 17th August 2014
review, The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out Of The Window And Disappeared, The, 100-Year-Old, Man, Who, Climbed, Out, Of, The, Window, And, Disappeared, film, movie, latest movies, new movie, movie ratings, current movie reviews, latest films, recent movies, current movies, movie critics, new movie reviews, latest movie reviews, latest movies out, the latest movies, review film, latest cinema releases, Australian reviews, cinema, cinema reviews, Robert Gustafsson, Mia Skäringer, Johan Rheborg, Alan Ford, Felix Herngren
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THE 100-YEAR-OLD MAN WHO CLIMBED OUT OF THE WINDOW AND DISAPPEARED

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THEATRICAL REVIEW

RELEASE DATE: 21/08/2014
RUN TIME: 1HR 54MIN
CAST: ROBERT GUSTAFSSON
MIA SKÄRINGER
JOHAN RHEBORG
ALAN FORD
DIRECTOR: FELIX HERNGREN
PRODUCERS: HENRIK JANSSON-SCHWEIZER
PATRICK NEBOUT
FELIX HERNGREN
MALTE FORSSELL
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Jess Fenton
By Jess Fenton, 17th August 2014
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I’m calling this one Sweden’s answer to 'Forrest Gump'. This delightful black comedy is known locally as the most successful Swedish film of all time. Everywhere else, it's going to be known as the Swedish Forrest Gump... I’m trying to make it a thing.

Allan Karlsson is sitting in his retirement home bedroom on his hundredth birthday, completely sound of mind and body, knowing he’s nothing like the others around him. He decides to climb out the window of his ground floor room and head to the bus station. He purchases a one way ticket to the next location he can afford, not quite knowing why or what he’ll find once he’s there. While waiting for the bus, an angry biker struggling to take his large suitcase into the toilet stall with him leaves the case with Allan, who promptly boards his bus, case in hand. This suitcase just happens to be filled with $50,000,000.

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Such a situation is not new for Allan. His whole life he’s always just happened to be in the right place at the right time - actually more like the wrong place and the right time, from world wars to the company of high profile political figures during the 20th century. Due to Allan’s poor and unfortunate childhood he has a carefree and unique view of people and the world. In the midst of war, all he can see is stuff to blow up, regardless of sides. In the presence of dictators and life threatening situations, he’s too hungover to realise and turns the evening into a party. And so his life goes like this, for 100 years.

I’m calling this one Sweden’s answer to 'Forrest Gump'.

Faced with a fortune, a gang of bikers hot on his tail, and a cop, an elephant and amounting new friends along his journey, all the wrong things happen in just the right way as only they can when Allan is around.

50-year-old Robert Gustafsson plays Allan almost the entire film. Young, old, drunk, sober, and all that’s inbetween, Gustafsson is hard to tear your eyes away from. As the quirky Karlsson, his peculiar adventures are a little shaky in the “makes sense” department but they’re never boring, and show modern history from a never-before-seen point of view.

Don’t be deterred by the origin of this film, it’s predominantly in English and Swedish with smatterings of Russian, French and German - and anyway, real humour transcends all language barriers.

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